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    Fashion History: The Haute Couture Era

    Mai 11th, 2017

    By the end of the 19th century the horizons of the fashion industry had generally broadened. The more mobile and independent lifestyle causes many well-off women to begin to adopt and to wear the practical clothes they demanded.

    Fashion History from 1900 – 1910

    Throughout the early 20th century Paris dictated high-end fashion. Parisian designers set the fashion tone for the rest of the Western world, and their designs were highly sought for women of the upper classes. Although the two most important fashion terms and their division haute couture and pret-a-porter wasn’t sharply defined, nevertheless both fashion magazines and department stores all over the world sent their editors and buyers to the exclusive Paris Fashion Shows to follow the newest high-end fashion trends and styles. At this time fashion style magazines started to include photographs in their article and became even more influential than in the future.

    Remarkable wastes defined the fashion of the decade. And the couturiers of that time created incredibe extravagant outfits which were meticulously made. Worn by the fashionable women of the Belle Époque the outfits highlighted the S-Bend silhouette of the full-figured body. The S-Bend corset was very tightly laced at the waist which forced the hips back and the drooping mono bosom was thrust forward in a pouter pigeon effect creating a S shape. Toward the end of the decade the fashionable silhouette gradually became somewhat more straight and slim, due to Paul Poiret’s high-waisted, shorter-skirted Directoire line of clothes. Curvy hips were also flaunted by the dress styles of the era. In the early years of the first decade, skirts were only long and full. No fashionable lady could (or would) dress or undress herself without the assistance of a third party. Unlike today, the constant radical changes of the fashion trends were still literally unthinkable. The use of different trimmings were all that distinguished the styles season after season.

    This video shows Fashion in the early 1900′s:

    Fashion History from 1910 – 1918

    From 1910 until the start of the First World War in 1914, skirts gradually grew shorter and began to reveal tantalizing glimpses of the ankle. The overall silhouette of dresses also changed slightly, moving toward a slimmer, narrower and straighter line that emphasized the hips and busts. As the war began in 1914, attention and materials were drawn away from fashion design, and no significant fashion developments occurred again until peace was declared at the end of 1918.

    The most influential fashion designers of the time were Paul Poiret, Jacques Doucet and Mariano Fortuny. Paul Poiret has evolved the first outfit which women could put on without the help of a maid. He was one of the first who translated his vogue into the fashion world with his exotic kimonos and vivid colors. While the French designer Jacques Doucet excelled in superimposing pastel colors and his elaborate gossamery dresses suggested the Impressionist shimmers of reflected light, Mariano Fortuny was a curious figure with very few parallels in any age. For his dress designs he conceived a special pleating process and new dyeing techniques. Each garment was made of the finest silk.

    Fashion History from 1918 – 1920

    World War I changed the fashion world for ever. Women chose to dress like men and borrowed their clothes from the male, corsets were refused and both bustless, waistless silhouette and the flapper style became very popular among yound women. The sporty and athletic look for both women and men were popularized equally as well.

    The menswear emphasized youthfulness and relaxation in the 1920s. Unlike before the young men were no longer afraid to show their growing mood of informality, especially not the Americans. What was very tradional in the past, wearing a special outfit for every event in the well-dressed gentleman’s day, wasn’t popular any longer. Men began to wear the same soft wool suit all day long and felt confident. Short suit jackets replaced the old long jackets of the past which were now only worn for formal occasions. Men prefered more the sport clothes, including sweaters and short pants and the London cut, with its slim lines, loose-fitting sleeves, and padded shoulders were very popular.

    At that time the couturière Coco Chanel was a major figure in fashion for her chic and progressive designs. Chanel evolved the little black dress, the Chanel-Costume and the use of jersey knit for women’s clothing.

    Watch how Fashion changed after WWI due to Coco Chanel’s influence:

    Related article: Couture isn’t dead. It’s an article about how haute couture is demand than ever after the economic crise in the 21st century.

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    Streetstyle New York: Dress of the week #8 – Denise

    Mai 1st, 2017

    Throwback Thursday

    (We met Denise in September 2010 in New York)

    Denise approaches another level of top boots. We call them “over the top boots” without being negative or sarcastic. This boots are just an amazing, artsy piece of Versace and Denise certainly knows how to combine it with a vivid red Chanel handbag and catchy Marc Jacobs glasses. We don’t know about you but in our mind Denise is just Manhattan-Style at its best.

    Related Articles:
    1_Balenciaga boots worn by Michelle, Streetstyle New York #23
    2_Versace in speakfashion’s fashion dictionary
    3_Latest Fashion News: Versace for H&M

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    Fashion Backstage: Speaking Fashion with Shoe Designer Ruthie Davis

    April 12th, 2017

    Interview blast from the past, October 2011, New York.

    speak fashion, fashion backstage, Ruthie Davis, Shoe Designer Ruthie Davis, Ruthie Davis Shoes, Shoedesigner, Shoe Designer, Ruthie Davis Interview

    Thumb through the Ruthie Davis video

    Don’t have the time to see the entire interview? Just browse through. Below we emphasize Ruthie Davis’ most remarkable quotes.

    ‘Well, if a Manolo Blahnik and a Nike had a Baby, what would it look like? The answer to this question was my original brand concept.’ [01:54]

    ‘What I am attracted to in a shoe is actually its construction and therefore the heel.’ [03:28]

    ‘I am usually inspired by buildings, sidewalks, fences – things that are sort of industrial looking.’ [04:23]

    ‘No, I do not think that men are better Shoe Designers.’ [08:37]

    ‘I have a new quote which is: Entrepreneurship equals Design’. [09:01]

    ‘I think it’s starting to happen that Designers now realize that they need to have the business skills.’ [09:25]

    ‘A new Fashion Designer first and foremost needs one basic skill: experience.’ [10:29]

    ‘What’s the bigger picture? A lot of people tend to have this one idea and don’t think about the overall concept.’ [13:46]

    ‘I do think there is a need for great men’s shoes.’ [14:15]

    Catch up with Ruthie Davis

    Ruthie Davis in the digital cloud:
    Like or tweet with Ruthie Davis’ on Facebook or Twitter
    Read from Ruthie Davis with Love on Tumblr
    Find more Ruthie Davis Shoe Designs on Blogger
    Visit the Corporate Site of Ruthie Davis Shoes

    Related Articles:
    1_Versage boots worn by Denise, Streetstyle New York #8
    2_Ruthie Davis in speakfashion’s fashion dictionary
    3_Ed Hardy’s beauty heel in speakfashion’s fashion style tip

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    Let’s ask the Fashion Dictionary: What’s a Samite?

    März 14th, 2017

    Samite belongs to the category: fabrics.

    Must known fashion term #62: Samite

    Samite, also called xamitum, is a rich, heavy silk fabric generally interwoven with silver or gold threads in brocade effects. This kind of fabric is usually used for designing stretchy garments such as dresses, gowns or skirts.

    If you’d like to learn more useful fashion terms just click yourself through our fashion dictionary or download our app on iTunes: ‘FAD – The ultimate Fashion Dictionary’.

    ps: Have you discovered a fashion term you’d like to introduce to our fellow fashion speakers? Feel free to drop us a line or leave a comment below and we’ll share it here.

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    Fashion History Classics: Who invented the Cloche Hat?

    Februar 27th, 2017

    The well known cloche hat was invented by the Parisian milliner and French fashion designer Caroline Reboux (1837-1927) in 1908. Due to the fitted, bell-shaped form of her invention, she named her hat – “cloche” hat, a French translation of the English word “bell”. The hat even shaped hairstyles and became especially popular during the 1920s, and continued to be commonly seen until about 1933.

    Read the rest of this entry

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    Streetstyle New York: Dress of the week #7 – Lana Belasco

    Februar 9th, 2017

    Throwback Thursday

    (We met Lana in August 2010 in New York)

    Isn’t she a dream in red? We encountered Lana a couple of days ago on her way to a cocktail party. Unfortunately she didn’t remember where she got her adorable red costume, including the very fancy handbag.

    The dress might be Barami. The retailer currently offers a dress that looks very similar to Lana’s. Regrettably you can’t order it online. But if you are in the mood, stop by at the store at 57th and Lexington Ave. It’s still there. We checked it out yesterday afternoon.

    Related Articles:
    1_Red dress worn by Nelia, Streetstyle New York #25
    2_Fashion Style Tip: Catherine Malandrino’s red jumpsuit
    3_Fashion Style Tip: ASOS red zip dress

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