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    Swinging Sixties

    Juni 1st, 2015

    The Swinging Sixties were a cultural and political movement and revolution beginning in the 1960’s in Europe and the US. It was a counter-movement to the past and present wars and depressions. Society, and especially youth was longing for peace and harmony and expressed this in their behavior, music and fashion. At the center of the Swinging Sixties was London’s Carnaby Street, which had become a mecca of fashion and music and was the place to be for everyone that considered themselves “hip”. During this period fashion became very flamboyant and provocative. Mary Quant invented the mini skirt and Twiggy became the face of the movement as a fashion model embodying innocence, love and harmony.
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    Baby Boomers

    Juni 1st, 2015

    The baby boomers were a wave of children born in the years following WWII in the countries affected by this war. In 1946, just a year after WWII had ended, 20% more children were born than in the previous year. The generation that had been affected by the war, were looking toward a bright future, longing for normality and therefore procreated more than average. The new-born generation was crucial to the economy, as there had never been as many middle class kids. The baby boomer years lasted till 1964. Also today the baby boomers, which are beginning to retire, have a huge influence on our economy, as the following generation will have to support the above average amount of senior citizens and therefore will spend less money on other consumer goods such as food and fashion.
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    Mash-Up Decade

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The The Mash-Up Decade is considered to be the era from 2000 to 2010. The so-called ‘mash-up’ decade got its name because it is the first decade that didn’t have a certain style for the most part. In the early 2000s fashion designers rather recycled already existing high-end fashion styles from the past decades and continued the minimalist look of the 1990s in a more polished way. Later on, designers began to adopt a more colorful, feminine, excessive, and ‘anti-modern’ look. Vintage and retro clothing, especially from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s became extremely popular and colors like baby blue, yellow and hot pink were very common. As women’s fashion moved away from the unisex styles of the 1990s, the very feminine and dressy styles were reintroduced in the early years of this decade. Women wore denim miniskirts and jackets, tank tops, flip-flops and ripped jeans. The men’s fashion in these years was more cool and sporty. Trainers, baseball caps, light-colored polo shirts and boot-cut jeans were pretty popular. Read the rest of this entry
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    Present Era

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The Present Era is considered to be the era that lasted from 1980 to 2000. Since the end of the 20th century the vicissitudes of globalization and the development of new technologies for design and production (including the creation of new “techno textiles”) increases the influence of the future of fashion. Synthetic materials such as Lycra, Spandex, and Viscose became widely-used. Back to that time fashion turned to the past for inspiration, after two decades of looking to the future.

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    Fashion Revolution Era

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The Fashion Revolution Era is considered to be the era that lasted from 1960 to 1980. By the 1960s, the empire of fashion had begun to break up into various style tribes. The coming of age of the postwar baby boom generation, together with a strong economy, led to the rise of an international youth culture that completely revolutionized the fashion system. “Youth quake” styles were closely linked to popular music, especially in London, where young women first started wearing miniskirts, while men dressed like peacocks. Forth fashions were soon followed by stylish versions of hippie anti-fashion. Despite the rise of influential new designer and popular trends, the time had clearly passed when a single designer could dominate the look of a season or decade the way Dior once had with the “New Look” of 1947. Italy, Japan and New York became new centers of fashion. Read the rest of this entry
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    New Look Era

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The New Look Era is considered to be the era that lasted from 1940 to 1960. During World War II fashion responded to the restrained mood and economy of the war. Many fashion houses closed during occupation of Paris. During World War II (1939 – 1945), all types of cloth were needed for a variety of wartime purposes, and material for clothing was severely rationed and limited for each year and its number decreased steadily as the war progressed. From 1940 onward, no more than thirteen feet (four meters) of cloth was permitted to be used for a coat and a little over 3 feet (1 meter) was all that allowed for a blouse. No belt could be over 1.5 inches (3 centimeters) wide. Despite this, haute couture tried to keep its flag flying. Fashions of the era emphasized shorter skirts than ever before, buttons for any type of clothes were limited to three per item, evening wear was also shortened and women were encouraged to make do with ankle socks and bare legs.

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    Modern Era

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The Modern Era is considered to be the era that lasted from 1920 to 1940. World War II created many radical changes in the fashion industry. After the War, Paris wasn’t the global center of fashion like it used to be and mass-manufactured fashion became increasingly popular. During the 1920s clothing styles officially entered the modern era of fashion design. The traditional divide that had always existed between the high society and worker class was suddenly questioned in the West. A new young generation was born who fought against the existing differences. Women began to liberate themselves from constricting and uncomfortable gowns for the first time. They were open for casual and more comfortable styles like pants and shorter skirts, low waistlines, and revolutionary styles of the flapper era.

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    Haute Couture Era

    Mai 4th, 2015

    The Haute Couture Era is considered to be the era that lasted from 1900 to 1920. By the end of the 19th century the horizons of the fashion industry had generally broadened. The more mobile and independent lifestyle causes many well-off women to begin to adopt and to wear the practical clothes they demanded. Throughout the early 20th century, Paris dictated high-end fashion. Parisian designers set the fashion tone for the rest of the Western world, and their designs were highly sought for women of the upper classes. Although the two most important fashion terms and their division haute couture and pret-a-porter wasn’t sharply defined, nevertheless both fashion magazines and department stores all over the world sent their editors and buyers to the exclusive Paris Fashion Shows to follow the newest high-end fashion trends and styles. Read the rest of this entry
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    The 19th Century Fashion

    Mai 4th, 2015

    Since the 19th century, clothing has been primarily divided into day wear and evening wear, categories governed by specific dress codes. In general, longer sleeves and higher necklines were meant for the day. Shorter sleeves and lower necklines were considered appropriate for the evening. These rules remained in force throughout the 19th century and even beyond. While the rise of capitalism and democracy men’s fashion become more sober, but women’s clothing continued to be decorative. The making and selling of clothes changed dramatically ever the course of the 19th century, as traditional crafts gave way, on one hand to rise of read-made clothing and on the other hand to the development of the haute couture. Fashion magazines, patterns and department stores made stylish clothing available to an ever-expanding population of costumes. Paris was the capital of women’s fashion, as London was of men’s.
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    The 18th Century Fashion

    Mai 4th, 2015

    Fashion has been characterized as “a capricious goddess” and the very paradigm of superficiality, frivolity and vanity. Alternatively, fashion is often described as “the mirror of history” – the reflection of wars, revolutions and other world historical events. Up until the middle of the 18th century, fashion was a fairly reliable visual indicator of the wear’s social rank. But fashion’s “old régime” was already coming to an end, as the aristocracy and gentry increasingly lost both their traditional monopoly on fashionable luxuries and their hold on political and economic power. Trade in textiles was one of the driving forces in European expansion, and the mechanization of textile production was the engine of the industrial revolution. Innovations in spinning and weaving technology, dyes, fabric printing and other processes made a widening range of textiles available to the fashion industry at prices that an increasing number of people could afford.
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